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Information provided on this page is for informational purposes only. All situations are different. Please consult your legal counsel on how this legislation applies to your specific company or situation.

COVID-19 Related Q&A for Employers

Have a question?

We have provided answers to often asked questions related to the current COVID 19 situation below.

Because the details of any issue are important, email Rebecca Woods, Director of HR (beckyw@advanstaff.com) or your HR Specialist before taking any significant action based on the information below.


Common questions may be answered below.
Please select a topic below:

Frequently Asked Questions

Under Nevada law, you can reduce pay for salaried employees, however,

  1. you must provide them with a 7 day advance notice.  
  2. Also, pay can not be reduced below minimum wage for hourly paid workers and can not be reduced below $684 per week for salaried employees.

You could reduce hours for the next two weeks instead of reducing pay, however,

  1. If a salaried person works any part of the workweek including just coming in for a meeting, getting on the phone to discuss business, accessing work through a remote system or ANY kind of work, they would have to be paid for the full work week at a minimum of $684 and again would need a 7 day advance notice assuming that would be a reduction of their normal salary
  2. You could reduce the hours of work of an hourly paid worker to 0.
    1. You would just not reduce the wage and would be able to pay just for any hours worked
    2. If you do reduce hours of work to 0 for an hourly paid worker, they would be eligible to apply for unemployment insurance, however, their active status will slow down the claims process and likely cause an issue since tens of thousands of claims are being processed by the state right now

If you lay off employees for two weeks (or so)

  1. You would have to pay a salaried worker through the end of the day of their last day of work
  2. You would have to pay an hourly paid worker just for actual hours worked
  3. They would be eligible to apply for unemployment
  4. You would need to go through rehire through our system and the paperwork necessary would depend upon how long they are actually off work

get a financial benefit would be dependent upon the factors shown in red below:

Partial/Total Claims
A person whose pay and hours of work have been reduced by his regular employer because of lack of work in any week may be eligible for partial unemployment benefits. He is eligible if his earnings in the week of reduced work are less than the unemployment insurance benefit he would have received if totally unemployed. The amount of benefits is equal to the difference between the weekly benefit amount and the earnings, plus 25 percent of the earnings. 

We can not calculate what this would be for any employee, nor should any of us try. The reason is that the overall formula for UI benefits is complex, the addition of the rule above makes it much more difficult to calculate, and we don’t know if any particular employee has other employment that might impact their eligibility and/or the number above.  For that reason, we leave it up to the state of Nevada to determine eligibility and potential benefit amount.

Here are some additional considerations when reducing employee hours:

  1. The unemployment claim response and need for follow up with the state is more onerous because we have to share information back and forth to help the state determine eligibility and amount
  2. The employee is still held to the same general standards, that is, they generally must still seek work
  3. The employee will still become ineligible for certain benefit plans that require a certain number of hours of work to remain in the plan.  Therefore, they will need to be offered COBRA at the  point they loose eligibility for each plan.

Other considerations:

  1. You can fully lay off some employees and reduce hours for others.
    1. Just be certain that there is no appearance of “illegal discrimination”, that is, a bias against employees in a protected class.
    2. As an example, if it turned out that all Caucasian employees were given reduced hours and all African American (for ex.) employees were fully laid off, there could be the appearance of illegal bias.
  2. If you reduce hours for any employee, you would make all status changes through the Manager web portal as well as when employees are returned to their old status
  3. If employees are fully laid off and are later rehired, you would work with us on the rehire process as that is a little more complicated and requires our assistance.

Hourly Paid Employees:
Yes, you can reduce the hourly rate of pay for an hourly paid employee, however, you must do so in advance of the date the reduction goes into effect. Some states including Nevada, require that you notify an employee in writing of the new wage no less than 7 days in advance of the new hourly wage going into effect. Other states, including California, New York, DC, etc., require that you use a specific state required form to notify an employee of a reduction in hourly rate of pay in advance of the date the rate change goes into effect. Under no circumstances, can you pay an hourly worker less than the minimum wage in effect for the jurisdiction and specific circumstances. Notification should always be in writing, be specific to the individual impacted and be stored in written form in a location which will allow easy retrieval in the future.

A. Hourly Paid Employees:
Generally, a business needs to pay hourly paid workers only through the last hour they worked for the company. However, there are some states that require employers to pay “show up pay” if an hourly paid worker comes into work and is sent home early. California, for instance, requires that someone who shows up for work be paid a minimum of 2 hours. The District of Columbia (DC) requires that someone who shows up for work be paid a minimum of 4 hours. Nevada does not require businesses to pay beyond the amount of time an hourly paid worker actually works.

Salaried Paid Employees:
Salaried paid workers must be paid their preset salary for the full week for any week in which they do any work for the employer. For instance, if they come in on Monday morning and attend a planning meeting in which they are told they are being laid off, they would be paid their salary for the entire week. If they have PTO or other paid time available, that paid time can be used to pay them, but any shortfall in the weekly salary that is not made up by PTO or other paid time, must be paid by the employer. In any week in which a salaried employee does no work for the company, there is no obligation to pay them their salary. Note, however, that any type of work including phone calls, meetings, answering emails, logging into systems, answering employee questions, etc. will be considered “work” and will trigger the need in any given week to pay the full salary (without reduction) for that week.

There are some caveats and dependencies related to both the hourly and salary paid guidance above, so please contact AdvanStaff for a discussion of the circumstances should your company be considering how payment of wages works.

Category: Wage Payment; Layoff, Termination, Furlough

Client: We will have no employees authorized to work over 40 hours a week and some will be below the salary threshold. 

Response: No employee who remains in an “exempt” status can be paid less than $684 per week regardless of the number of hours worked.

Client: We want to make sure that we cover our bases with what can and can’t be done.  All employees affected are signing a letter to agree with their new salary.

Response: You can lower the hourly wage for an hourly worker and the salary for a salaried worker, but you must give each person a minimum written 7 day advance notice of the wage reduction before implementing.  Additionally, the following applies:

  1. The lowest possible salary for a salaried employee would be $684 per week, nothing less- even if they work less than full time.
  2. The lowest possible hourly wage for an hourly paid person would be the applicable minimum wage.

Client: Is the threshold for exempt only or can we change them to non-exempt?

Response: You can change an exempt person to an hourly rate of pay however, the following applies:

  1. You must give a minimum written 7 day notice of the wage change before implementing
  2. You must pay an hourly rate of pay of no less than the applicable minimum wage
  3. You would have to change the person to a timekeeping system and keep accurate hour by hour time records from the implementation date forward, just as you do for other hourly paid workers
  4. You would need to pay them overtime – either daily or after 40 hours, whichever would be applicable down the road, just like other hourly paid workers
  5. If you pay the hourly paid worker any bonus, incentive or other type of pay, you need to add that back into their base rate of pay to calculate the overtime rate of pay

Client: If the threshold stands for both exempt and non-exempt, should we then change them to hourly instead of salary?

Response: I am not positive what you mean by this, but if you do have salaried people for whom you wish to reduce salary, the salary can not be below $684 per week so it might make sense to change them to an hourly rate of pay using the rules above.

Salaried Paid Employees:
Yes you can reduce the salary rate of pay for a salary paid employee, however, you must do so in advance of the date the reduction goes into effect. Some states including Nevada, require that you notify an employee in writing of the new wage no less than 7 days in advance of the new salary going into effect. Other states, including California, New York, DC, etc. require that you use a specific state required form to notify an employee of a reduction in salary in advance of the date the rate change goes into effect.

Under no circumstances, can you pay a salaried worker less than the minimum salary as required under the Fair Labor Standards Act (or state law should state law be more generous) wage in effect even if the salaried worker will not be required to work full time.

For instance, if you have a salaried manager who makes $50,000 per year ($961.63 per week) who is going to work half time, you can not reduce his/her salary to $25,000 per year ($480.76 per week). The minimum salary that you can pay is $35,568 per year ($684 per week). Notification should always be in writing, be specific to the individual impacted, and be stored in written form in a location which will allow easy retrieval in the future.

There are some caveats and dependencies related to the information above, so please contact AdvanStaff for a discussion of the circumstances should your company be considering reductions in wage or salary.

Because the state of Nevada requires employers with more than 50 employees to provide at least 40 hours of PTO to all full and part time employees and those employees do not need to provide a reason for their absence, it is possible that a Nevada employer with 50 or more employees may not be able to compel an employee to use up his/her accrued PTO when they are out.

Other employers are generally allowed to compel an employee to use up his/her paid time out hours although exceptions may apply in some states.

There are some caveats and dependencies related to the information above, so please contact AdvanStaff for a discussion of the circumstances should your company be considering trying to compel employees to use accrued paid time out.

A. Yes, generally you can reduce an employee’s working hours and there is ususaly no notice requirement. However, if your reduce a salaried person’s working hours, and intend to reduce his/her salary as well, you must give advance notice of the change in salary and the salary level can not be lower than $684 per week regardless of how many hours the salaried person works. If a salaried person’s salary is reduced, various state laws dictate how much notice must be given and whether that notice must be in writing.

If you have reduced working hours for an employee, yet you require them to be “on call” in case they are needed, there may be the need to pay the employee under federal law for on call time depending upon the circumstances and your requirement for their availability. State laws can apply as well.

Remember that reduction in employee working hours can make them ineligible for certain benefit plans and trigger not only the loss of coverage, but also the need to offer COBRA or other continuation under applicable state law.

There are some caveats and dependencies related to the information above, so please contact AdvanStaff for a discussion of the circumstances should your company be considering reductions in working hours, particularly for salaried employees.

Frequently Asked Questions

Special Open Enrollment Period

AdvanStaff HRs primary carriers (HPN/Sierra/UHC) are offering a new open enrollment period for employees to make NEW benefit elections based on a life event (COVID-19 Pandemic).

Employees will log into the Employee Portal (ESS) and click on the “Life Event” tile.  You will then be launched into the benefit enrollment module. 

The opportunity will be limited to employees who previously did not elect coverage for themselves (spouses, children) or waived coverage. The enrollment opportunity will extend from March 23 to April 6, 2020.

THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE ONLY TO ADVANSTAFF HR SPONSORED PLAN INSURED BY HEALTH PLAN IF NEVADA -OR- SIERRA HEALTH AND LIFE. IT IS NOT LEGISLATION. PLEASE CHECK WITH YOUR PLAN ADMINISTRATOR OR INSURANCE AGENT ON SOLUTIONS AVAILABLE TO YOUR PLAN.


Yes!! We have received clarification on this! This is great news!

When the employee hours are reduced, the employer may choose to pay all the employee premium (for up to 92 days after the end of employment) and the benefits will not terminate. Please read below for details.

The AdvanStaff HR Benefits team is here to administer this great service to your employees!

This provision is for both small group and large groups and applies to AdvanStaff HR’s master group medical policies.

  • Health Plan Of Nevada (HPN) – HMO
  • Sierra Health & Life (SHL) – PPO, POS, and Out-of-area OOA
  • Note: This does NOT apply to United HealthCare (UHC)
  • Please verify the carrier by looking at your health insurance card

Group Enrollment Agreement: Active at Work Provision
Effective immediately, Health Plan of Nevada (HPN) and Sierra Health and Life (SHL) will temporarily suspend the “Active at Work” provisions found within our Group Enrollment Agreements for currently covered employees so long as the regularly scheduled premium payment is made. HPN/SHL will provide additional updates with respect to this temporary suspension as needed. 

** This means the number hours worked during the COVID-19 crisis does not affect the benefit eligibility stratus so long as premium is paid.

Rehire Provision 
Please review the following information regarding probationary period/waiting period for rehired employees. 

Effective immediately, HPN/SHL will temporarily change to the following rehire provisions:

  • If a person is rehired within 31 days, they will be reinstated back to date of loss.
  • If a person is rehired in 32‑92 days, they will not be subject to a probationary period and will be effective on the date of rehire or first of the month following the rehire date, depending on the policy.
  • If a person is rehired after 92 days, the standard probationary period will apply. This means the employee would have to wait your groups normal probation waiting period.

For questions about these temporary changes, please contact the AdvanStaff Benefit Administration Team, please open a ticket.

Great Question!

We have created a special layoff status code “Layoff COVID-19” in the Manager Portal to accommodate the terminations and layoffs being processed by worksite managers. 

To do this, we will change the “Employee Status” and not use “Employee termination.” 

Please select Layoff in both the Employment Status and the Type and the reason of Layoff COVID-19. 

This will allow HR to reactivate the employees status quickly in the HRIS Cloud system and won’t force the manual implications of a termination.  

If the employee is not going to come back, then AdvanStaff HR or the manager would move them to Terminated Status under employee terminations at that time.  

Thank you for your help and please let me know if you have any questions.

This answer will vary state-by-state. Please submit a question for your specific question. The answer below pertains to Nevada.

For the state of NV, the only time PTO must be paid out is if the company policy includes payout at termination.

If your company has a policy written or otherwise to payout PTO at termination, then you must stay consistent with that policy.

View the NV Statute

** This is a multi-state answer, all situations are different, but this answer demonstrates the importance of following state law and policies already defined by your handbook or past practices. **

Answer:  Pay out of vacation pay is per your company policy so the policy below would apply.

Section in our NV employee handbook under Benefits / PTO:

  • Team members may carry over 16 hours to the next “benefit year”.  Team Members will forfeit any unused PTO hours exceeding the 16 hours carried over to the next “benefit year”.  XYZ Company will not “cash out” any additional unused PTO time.  Upon termination of employment (no matter the reason), team members will not be compensated for unused PTO balance.

Client statement: Q. In CA, our employees accrue PTO as they go.  What is the law in CA for the same thing?

Answer:  CA employers are obligated to pay out all accrued, but unused PTO at the time of termination of employment for any reason. 

If you layoff any employees in CA OR NV, their final payroll check must be provided on their last day of employment.  In CA it must include all accrued and unused PTO as noted above.

As you can imagine, many of our clients are laying off substantial portions of their staff, so please make certain that you provide enough days to ensure timely payment of final wages for anyone who is being laid off.

Frequently Asked Questions

We have created a special layoff status code “Layoff COVID-19” in the Manager Portal to accommodate the terminations and layoffs being processed by worksite managers. 

Great Question!

To do this, we will change the “Employee Status” and not use “Employee termination.” 

Please select Layoff in both the Employment Status and the Type and the reason of Layoff COVID-19. 

This will allow HR to reactivate the employees status quickly in the HRIS Cloud system and won’t force the manual implications of a termination.  

If the employee is not going to come back, then AdvanStaff HR or the manager would move them to Terminated Status under employee terminations at that time.  

Thank you for your help and please let me know if you have any questions.

Hourly Paid Employees:
Generally, a business needs to pay hourly paid workers only through the last hour they worked for the company. However, there are some states that require employers to pay “show up pay” if an hourly paid worker comes into work and is sent home early. California, for instance, requires that someone who shows up for work be paid a minimum of 2 hours. The District of Columbia (DC) requires that someone who shows up for work be paid a minimum of 4 hours. Nevada does not require businesses to pay beyond the amount of time an hourly paid worker actually works.

Salaried Paid Employees:
Salaried paid workers must be paid their preset salary for the full week for any week in which they do any work for the employer. For instance, if they come in on Monday morning and attend a planning meeting in which they are told they are being laid off, they would be paid their salary for the entire week. If they have PTO or other paid time available, that paid time can be used to pay them, but any shortfall in the weekly salary that is not made up by PTO or other paid time, must be paid by the employer. In any week in which a salaried employee does no work for the company, there is no obligation to pay them their salary. Note, however, that any type of work including phone calls, meetings, answering emails, logging into systems, answering employee questions, etc. will be considered “work” and will trigger the need in any given week to pay the full salary (without reduction) for that week.

There are some caveats and dependencies related to both the hourly and salary paid guidance above, so please contact AdvanStaff for a discussion of the circumstances should your company be considering how payment of wages works.

Category: Wage Payment; Layoff, Termination, Furlough

  • Furlough is generally used in collective bargaining environments and implies a “call back” requirement and may impact how benefits and seniority are handled.  If used when laying off a person, it can make the unemployment compensation application process more complicated because it implies the person is going to be called back to work so UI will usually ask when the call back will occur.  That correspondence slows down the unemployment application process.
  • Layoff is used to indicate that employment has ended.  Some employers and employees view layoff as if it implies recall, but it doesn’t normally do so.  The terminology layoff seems to speed the unemployment process a little bit because they are not looking for any other information other than the date of layoff.  Because this is a unique situation, they could possibly inquire about that, but I doubt it.
  • I don’t know that there is a distinction between how the employer and employee view the terminology.  Furlough may feel better to the employee, or not.
  • I generally don’t like to use the term furlough because you may not bring back some people and that can be contentious if they thought they would be “recalled”.

A. There is little difference in any of those terms and each has the same basic result, that is, the employee is no longer working for the company. The terminology you use may be selected based on how you want your company to be perceived by the employee, the remaining employees and/or the community at large.

If you use “layoff” to describe a short or long term separation with the employee, that term clearly show that the employee lost employment through no fault of their own and that will generally reduce the time and effort it takes to manage an unemployment claim through the state unemployment insurance system.

If you use “termination” to describe a short or long term separation with the employee, that term will generally necessitate some level of investigation by the state unemployment insurance system and will require more resources to interact and respond to the state’s inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the termination.

If you use “furlough” to describe a short or long term separation with the employee, it indicates the employee will be called back to work, and will necessitate much more interaction with the state insurance system to show when the employee will return. “Furlough” is also a term generally related to collective bargaining agreements.

Please read the other article in this section regarding using the term “furlough.”

There are some caveats and dependencies related to the information above, so please contact AdvanStaff for a discussion of the circumstances should your company be considering any reduction in force.

Category: Layoff, Termination, Furlough

A. Generally, there is no set period of time that your company needs to provide prior to layoff.

However, if a layoff falls under the category of “mass layoff”, your company has 100 or more employees and the layoff will last more than 6 months, your company may be subject to federal WARN legislation that requires a minimum 60 day notice to impacted employees. In cases where its notice requirements would otherwise apply, the WARN Act provides a specific exception when layoffs occur due to unforeseeable business circumstances. This provision may apply to the COVID-19 coronavirus. This exception is limited, in that an employer relying upon it must still provide “as much notice as is practicable, and at that time shall give a brief statement of the basis for reducing the notification period.” In other words, once you are in a position to evaluate the immediate impact of the outbreak upon your workforce, you must then provide specific notice to “affected employees.” You must also provide a statement explaining the failure to provide more extensive notice, which in this case would obviously be tied to the unforeseeable nature of the outbreak and its aftermath.

If your company is subject to WARN generally speaking, you must provide at least 60 calendar days of notice prior to any covered plant closing or mass layoff.

Again, if employees are laid off for less than six months, then they do not suffer an employment loss and, depending on the particular circumstances, WARN notice will generally not be required.*  Unfortunately, in situations like this, it is hard to know how long the layoff will occur so providing notice is usually the best practice

The WARN Act has specific provisions requiring notice to employees, unions and certain government entities.

*WARN is not triggered when the following various thresholds for coverage are not met:

  1. If a plant closing or mass layoff results in fewer than 50 people losing their jobs at a single site of employment;
  2. If 50-499 workers lose their jobs and that number is less than 33% of the employer’s total active workforce at a single site;
  3. If a layoff is for 6 months or less; or
  4. If work hours are not reduced 50% in each month of any 6-month period

There are some caveats and dependencies related to the information above, so please contact AdvanStaff for a discussion of the circumstances should your company be considering reductions in force and you have 100 or more employees. California WARN applies when a company has 75 or more employees and the “unforeseeable business circumstances” exemption does not apply.

Category: Notification of Layoff; Layoff, Termination, Furlough

Employees who are subject to layoff will be eligible for unemployment benefits.  They should apply for unemployment insurance benefits at:  www.ui.nv.gov (nationwide list here.)

If you decide to lay off any of your staff, you would:

  1. notify each one of them separately that they are being “laid off”
  2. use the AdvanStaff automated system to enter each person in the system using a “layoff” code
  3. provide your AdvanStaff payroll specialist with the final hours owed for each laid off employee to produce their final check

If you have a PTO or vacation plan that allows for payout of unused hours to be paid upon termination, those hours would be paid out as well.

Additional Information:

  1. Under Nevada law, employees who are laid off must be paid their final payroll check on their last day of employment.  Please make certain that you give AdvanStaff sufficient time to produce final checks so you can be in compliance with payment law.
  2. Employees who are subject to layoff will be able to apply for unemployment benefits through the state of Nevada’s website- www.ui.nv.gov. Nationwide list here.
  3. AdvanStaff will respond to each claim
  4. Should you decide to rehire an employee who you laid off, you will work with AdvanStaff to get that done

AdvanStaff is here to help, so reach out to us with any other questions that come up.

Cut in hours:
Yes, they will be eligible for unemployment, but the extent and amount they would be able to collect is based on a fairly complex formula that the state uses, so the amount would not be known until they apply for benefits.  They can apply at: www.ui.nv.gov

Sick and need to stay home:
They can apply for benefits with the state and the state would determine eligibility depending upon how much time they missed.  Generally, someone who is sick and can not work, will be eligible, but the state evaluates everything and makes a determination based on the facts.  They can apply at:  www.ui.nv.gov.

Just a note, if you reduce the salary of any salaried employee, you must still pay a minimum of $684 per week under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

Frequently Asked Questions

A.There are many considerations when allowing employees to work remotely:

1) Businesses shoud notify their workers’ compensation carrier of home workers due to the need to provide coverage at their home location.

2) Remote work should include an “audit” of a home location suitability for employee safety on the job such as the existence of smoke detectors, appropriate equipment such as desks, chairs, properly elevated computer screens, etc. Other considerations include audit of trip and other hazards that may be more prevalent in the home than they are in an office setting.

3) Remote work should include an “audit” of security in the event your business is subject to HIPAA, engages in commerce that involves client data gathering and information, handles any other sensitive or restricted information on a regular basis and is responsible to clients, investors, etc. to maintain a workplace that requires the security of all information.

3) Remote work should include an “audit” of the individual’s home system security to ensure passing of confidential and secure information is not vunerable to hackers and others who may seek to take advantage of unsecured systems.

4) Remote work should ideally be approved with the caveat (in writing) that work obligations continue as if the employee is working in the office and that remote work can not be a substitute for daycare.

5) Remote work should ideally be accompanied by a written statement from the employer and acknowledged by the employee that it is intended to be short term in duration and the employer will require the employee’s return to the office setting in the employer’s sole discretion.

There are some caveats and dependencies related to the information above, so please contact AdvanStaff for a discussion of the circumstances should your company be considering deploying employees to work remotely. Should your company be covered under AdvanStaff’s workers’ compensation insurance, please contact us in advance of any such deployment.

Category: Remote Work

Frequently Asked Questions

Read the artile from our legal adisors at Jackson|Lewis LLP:

For coverage not managed by AdvanStaff HR:
If you manage your own work comp, please contact your agent for a definitive answer.

For coverage Managed by AdvanStaff HR:
Dianne Peace, our work comp risk managemnt specialist has confirmed the following:

  • Our carrier(s) have confirmed if a worker had to work from home while out because of the Coronavirus, what if anything is needed? (see reply from carrier)
    • So as long as the workers that are temporarily working remote are in states that they already have exposure in, there is no need to recode or add home addresses on the policy. To be safe, I would keep a running list of any of your clients that are implementing everyone working remote just so we have it on file in case a claim does come up.
  • Notify AdvanStaff HR via email (riskmanagement@advanstaff.com) if you will be implementing anyone working remotely, so we have it on file in case of a claim. You can also open a support ticket.

Q. What if an Employee is Injured while working from home?

Accidents happen during work, and they can just as easily occur in the home. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) business are responsible for providing employees with safe work environments. Be sure the employees workplace is safe and adheres set out by OSHA. https://www.osha.gov/

Original Question:
Although we have expressed to staff that even if on the schedule, if feeling sick or uncomfortable to work they can elect not to work.  If our staff works, can the employer be held responsible in court of law if an employee contracts the virus & then files a lawsuit stating that they believe they caught while on the job & they felt forced to work even though that is not the case—thanks

There really is no liability to the employer although it is possible that an employee could make a complaint to OSHA that the employer failed to maintain a “safe workplace” and that they violated OSHA safety law.  It seems unlikely but these are uncharted waters.

Although it is cynical of me, to say so, I do believe that plaintiff’s attorneys will be on the lookout for opportunities to benefit from this pandemic so I would not be surprised if they come up with some new legal theory that places some liability for having contracted an illness with an employer.  You don’t want to run your business based on a fear like that, but anything is possible in this litigious world.

This may be a moot point since the Governor has ordered the shut down of all non-essential businesses, however, here is my opinion.

  1. You do not need to allow employees to bring children to work and if you prefer that no one do that, I would let them know that unfortunately, you just will not allow that to be done.
    1. Bringing children in could be a little dangerous for them and possibly for distracted employees.
    2. If you do allow kids to be brought to work, I (personally) would confine them to a certain lounge or other location that is safe and secure.
    3. Bringing kids into work will be counter to the goal of social distancing and is really not a good idea.
  2. If you do allow it for some, but not for others, just be certain that you are not discriminating against anyone in a certain race, religion, gender, etc. by only allowing certain people to bring their children.

If you do bring someone back in, just reactivate them as an employee so coverage under Workers’ compensation insurance will be in place.  Depending upon how long they have been gone, they may need to complete new paperwork and you will “rehire” them through the process we have, but rehiring ensure workers’ compensation is in place.

Frequently Asked Questions

*** Please see the article in “Layoff, Terminations, and Furloughs” on how to temporarily process layoffs in the Manage Portal.

You will use a “Status Change labelled “COVID-19 Layoff” to flag employees for reduced hours or temporary layoffs.

We have may articles to answer questions on benefits, pay, the new Family First Coronavirus Relief Act and much more, please look through all the articles***

A. Whenever your company makes any change to an employee’s status (i.e. full to part time), rate of pay, hours of work, title, etc. that change must be made through the Manager web portal and needs to accurately reflect all changes being made as well as the effective date of any change. Changes to return an employee to a former status, rate of pay, hours of work, title, etc. must also be made through the Manager web portal and needs to accurately reflect all changes being made as well as the effective date of change.

Please reach out to your AdvanStaff Payroll, Benefits and/or HR Specialists for assistance and guidance related to any changes.

Loss of wages:

Should you lay off employees or reduce their hours and therefore their pay, employees will be eligible to file for unemployment compensation through the state of Nevada:  www.ui.nv.gov

Loss of revenue:

  • I am not aware of any state program related to loss of revenue, but there may be something.  I would stay tuned since the Governor shut down all essential businesses yesterday.  He mentioned no such thing in his announcement, but perhaps he has something in mind!
  • You may want to check into your general insurance coverage to see if you happened to purchase “business interruption” insurance.  It is along shot, but you never know if you have it and whether it might apply in this situation.

We wish you the best as you work through these new business challenges.

AdvanStaff will continue to be here to help!

All situations are different. Information provided on this site is not legal advice and is intended for informational purposes only.